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  • Vigil held for injured Nova Scotia woman dead man after attack on

    first_imgWYTHEVILLE, Va. — A vigil was held Thursday evening for a Nova Scotia woman who survived a knife attack on the Appalachian Trail and for the man who died in the incident.James Jordan, 30, of West Yarmouth, Mass., is charged with murder and assault with intent to commit murder in the attack, which left an Oklahoma man dead.Wythe County police have said 43-year-old Ronald Sanchez Jr., 43, was found dead early Saturday, about 100 metres from where the suspect was arrested.Foster did not have the name of the injured woman but said it was his understanding that she was from Nova Scotia.The president of the Appalachian Trail, Suzanne Dixon, said Thursday that users of the popular hiking trail are hoping for a full recovery of the injured woman and are reaching out in sympathy to Sanchez’s family.The group held a vigil Thursday evening at a baseball field in Damascus, Va.Hiking groups have said the entire event came as a shock, as the Appalachian Trail has a reputation for being safe even for people who hike alone.According to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, it is the longest hiking-only footpath in the world, stretching roughly 3,500 kilometres from Georgia to Maine.  More than 3 million people visit the trail every year and over 3,000 people attempt to hike the entire footpath in a single year. The Canadian Presslast_img read more

  • Young and TwoSpirited Newly elected band councillor represents change

    first_imgHanna Waswa is a newly elected band councillor for a fly-in and predominantly Christian Ojibway community.APTN NewsMartha TroianHanna Waswa remembers a time when she never wanted to return to her community.For a decade she made that her reality. She moved far away, went to high school, finished university, had her first kiss and worked successfully at several jobs.But over time, Waswa became deeply homesick.“I found myself missing home,” she says. “None of it felt it could be as important as going home and trying to be part of the changes.”Now Waswa, isn’t just home on the Eabametoong First Nation, also known as Fort Hope, about 350-kilometres north of Thunder Bay. The outspoken, two-spirited, 27-year-old is a newly elected band councillor for the fly-in and predominantly Christian Ojibway community.Bullied and houseboundWaswa remembers being raised in a log cabin away from the main settlement, living off the lake with her family.Then at age five, her family moved into the community. By the time she was in Grade 3 her life changed dramatically.“I was being bullied quite heavily,” says Waswa.Hanna at age seven. (Photo: Hanna Waswa)“Partially because I was mixed race and I didn’t look the same as everyone else. I didn’t have the same experiences and partially because of my sexuality.”Waswa’s father was a pastor and her Caucasian mother was from Nova Scotia.“I was teased a lot for liking girls even though I didn’t know that was a thing,” says Waswa. “It wasn’t even my conception in my world that you could be gay.”By the time she hit Grade 8, her parents pulled her out of school because of the bullying.“I essentially didn’t leave my house for two years,” recalls Waswa.“I didn’t want to be around anyone, I hated everyone, [and] I didn’t see any good come out of any relationship I had out of the reserve.”At 16, she went to high school in Belleville, an hour west of Kingston to live with an uncle who lived in Tyendinaga.“I promised myself that I wouldn’t go back in the closet”Moving further away from her home province, Waswa relocated to British Columbia to attend Trinity Western University, a private Christian institution, to study English and Communications.She was also still recovering from her childhood and coming to terms with her sexuality.“When I was there I had my first girlfriend,” said Waswa, adding the relationship was kept hidden.It wasn’t until one week before her graduation and after a close friend disclosed her own sexuality that Waswa did too.“We had all found each other, that moment for me was very significant,” Waswa said.“It was so wonderful when I could finally say, ‘Look I’m not broken, I just don’t like guys and that’s OK.”Hanna with her family at her graduation. (Photo: Hanna Waswa)At 21, Waswa finally came out and told her family she was gay. She was met with varying levels of acceptance.“I promised myself that I wouldn’t go back in the closet. That if anyone asked me that I wouldn’t hide who I was.”Waswa was also very homesick at this time, too, and decided it was time to return to the place she once loved, despite how long ago that was.“I came home and realized that most of the people I know of my age are queer in some way,” Waswa said.“There are people here who have really paved the way for me to come home in that sense.”Eabametoong First Nation. (Photo: Hanna Waswa)Waswa sees her community going through a shift given the number of two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and/or asexual (2SLGBTQQIA) people there now with many of them creating change.More people are also going back to the old ways.“There is a resurgence of traditional thought and teachings, we’re kinda caught in the middle of those two things.”Being part of a trajectoryWaswa decided to go back home after seeing positive media coverage about her community.“I saw a lot of hopeful and encouraging things coming out,” said Waswa.“When I ran for council there was this outgrowth of that desire to help with that trajectory and momentum building.”Like so many other First Nations, Eabametoong is reeling from the effects of the residential schools system: challenged by a shortage of housing, small crimes and substance abuse issues.Hanna and some of her supporters (Photo: Hanna Waswa)But seeing the commitment from community members wanting to make things better inspired Waswa.She ran for council and won. Waswa believes she was elected because of her platform.Waswa’s campaign focused on public spaces and community planning, preparing for climate change and revitalizing the Indigenous language.Most young people cannot speak Ojibwe or are not very fluent, says Waswa, who includes herself in that challenge.Hanna with the rest of the band council (Photo: Hanna Waswa)“Coming home really affirmed to me how much I love the community, [and] how much I want to be here,” said Waswa.“I wanted to put myself in a position where I can do the most good.”mtroian@aptn.ca@ozhibiiigelast_img read more

  • One poll commissioner gave dissent on 2 decisions on plaints against PM

    first_imgNew Delhi: One of the two election commissioners had dissented in the decision of the ‘full Election Election Commission’ to give clean chit to Prime Minister Narendra Modi in the two speeches made in Maharashtra last month, highly-placed sources aware of the development said on Friday.In the last three days, the Commission gave its decision on as many complaints by the Congress against the prime minister, alleging violation of the model code. One of the election commissioners, according to the sources, gave his dissent in EC’s decision to give clean chit to the prime minister on his speech at Wardha on April 1 where he attacked Congress chief Rahul Gandhi for contesting from minority-dominated Wayanad seat and his appeal to first-time voters by invoking the Balakot air strikes and the Pulwama martyrs in Latur on April 9. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra SinghThe ‘full Commission’ which takes such decisions comprises Chief Election Commissioner Sunil Arora and fellow election commissioners Ashok Lavasa and Sushil Chandra. The two decisions were then taken based on 2:1 majority as per prescribed law which governs the functioning the of the poll panel, the sources said. The Election Commission (Conditions of Service of Election Commissioners and Transaction of Business) Act, 1991 states that if the Chief Election Commissioner and other Election Commissioners differ in opinion on any matter, such matter shall be decided according to the opinion of the majority. The Commission transacts its business by holding regular meetings and also by circulation of papers. All Election Commissioners have equal say in the decision making of the Commission.last_img read more

  • ATT to report results for second quarter follows strong showing by Verizon

    NEW YORK, N.Y. – AT&T, the largest telecommunications company in the U.S., is reporting second-quarter results.The report will come Tuesday before the stock market opens. It comes after its biggest nemesis, Verizon Wireless, reported strong results last week.The quarter has lacked major drama for AT&T Inc. Investors are still wondering AT&T will be able to curb its outlays for iPhones, which it sells heavily subsidized, but the true test of that will come later this year, when Apple releases a new model.For the second quarter, analysts expect AT&T to report adding a net of about 200,000 subscribers on contract-based plans, which carry the highest monthly fees. That compares with Verizon’s gain of 888,000. AT&T to report results for second quarter, follows strong showing by Verizon AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by News Staff Posted Jul 24, 2012 3:05 am MDT read more

  • South Sudan UN condemns violence in Malakal civilian protection site

    Noting with concern the rising inter-communal tensions between the Dinka and Shilluk that precipitated the incident, the Secretary-General warned all parties against stoking ethnic disputes and called on them to refrain from any actions or statements that could further escalate the situation, according to a statement attributable to his spokesperson. “The Secretary-General also reminds all concerned, including Government security forces, of the inviolability of the United Nations compounds,” according to the statement. “He underscores in no uncertain terms that any attack directed against civilians, UN premises and peacekeepers may constitute a war crime.” In the statement, the Secretary-General also urged the leaders of South Sudan to implement without delay the peace agreement reached six months ago, so that the people of South Sudan can begin a process of reconciliation and healing. ‹ › Civilians flee the violence that erupted in the Protection of Civilians site in Malakal, South Sudan. Photo: UNMISS/Nyang Touch Earlier today, UNMISS strongly condemned the violence that erupted last night. In a press release, UNMISS said that violence involving the use of small arms, machetes and other weapons broke out yesterday in the late evening between youths from both communities, and that violence also continued this morning. “The Mission calls on all communities to refrain from violence, restore calm and resolve differences through dialogue,” UNMISS said. The Mission said that UNMISS police in charge of maintaining order within the protection sites immediately intervened with tear gas to disperse the crowd. Casualties were brought to the international non-governmental clinic at the site. UN troops have increased perimeter patrolling while physically securing areas in the vicinity of site, UNMISS said. The Mission is also engaging with local authorities in Malakal to de-escalate the situation. Stressing that such an attack against civilians and UN premises may constitute a war crime, UNMISS also reminded all concerned, including security forces, of the “civilian character of the compound, and the sanctity of UN assets and personnel, as well as that of the civilians protected inside the UN compound.” UNMISS protects 47,791 civilians in Malakal, while 198,440 civilians are currently protected at six UNMISS bases throughout South Sudan. read more

  • Dotting the i Ohio State secondary one of teams best offensive weapons

    OSU redshirt sophomore safety Malik Hooker (24) celebrates his pick-six during the second half of the Buckeyes game against Nebraska on Nov. 5. The Buckeyes won 62-3. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorOhio State hosted one of its biggest games of the year last week against No. 10 Nebraska, under the lights. It was the second largest crowd in Ohio Stadium history and arguably had the most talented list of visiting recruits since OSU coach Urban Meyer began his tenure. The pregame spectacle that was the laser-light show inside the team tunnel, the fireworks shooting off atop the scoreboard and an introduction video highlighting the 2014 national championship were done to make an impression on those in attendance. However, it was up to the Scarlet and Gray to leave the lasting impact. And so they did, with the defense setting the tone.Junior safety Damon Webb intercepted a pass that was tipped by junior linebacker Raekwon McMillan and redshirt sophomore cornerback Marshon Lattimore, then returned it 36 yards for a touchdown. That was the team’s fifth pick-six of the year, which marked a school record.“That was big. The crowd was going crazy on the first third down of the game,” Webb said. “That definitely lifted up the crowd and had momentum on our side.”The OSU defense has been a catalyst at times for an offense that has struggled with a quick start for nearly the whole season. Two weeks ago, for the very first time all year, the Buckeyes notched its first touchdown on its first drive of the game. This time around the defense was one of the best offensive weapons for coach Urban Meyer.Later in the game, redshirt sophomore safety Malik Hooker made a difference on defense by making his fifth interception and scoring his second touchdown of the 2016 season. OSU now has six interceptions for touchdowns this year, with three games still to play.The skill and athleticism in the OSU secondary has begged the question if any players have tried to play both sides, offense as well as defense. Co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Luke Fickell said that for the defense to get better, the player have to focus on their individual positions rather than try to learn a new one, not saying that the players wouldn’t be open to taking a stab on offense.Regardless, the OSU secondary has been electric when the players have the ball in their hands. Co-defensive coordinator and associate head coach Greg Schiano has been mostly responsible for the increase in scoring for the offense. Schiano has put an emphasis on making the most of opportunities; a play Schiano calls “sideline return.” McMillan said that there’s one thing on his mind when the ball is caught by one of his teammates: “Turn around and block somebody.” “This is a game of energy. It’s a game of momentum,” Fickell said. “If you got momentum, you got to find a way to keep it. If you don’t have the momentum, you got to do something.”OSU currently ranks fourth in the nation in passing defense and ninth in the country with 14 interceptions. Last Saturday, Nebraska was just 1-for-13 for 12 yards in downfield passing against Conley, Ward and Lattimore. Webb said that there’s not necessarily a competitive between the defensive backs to see who can have the most interceptions at season’s end, but there’s definitely some discussion in the group.“It’s definitely a confidence booster,” he said. “Just looking forward to Maryland and trying to make the same thing happen.As for any nicknames for the unit, Webb said that’s still a work in progress.No. 5 OSU kicks off at Maryland at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday. read more

  • Jewish father who let children ride bikes on Sabbath exposed them to

    first_imgJudge Rowe said she did not think that the man had deliberately flouted “expectations on him”.She said “two loving parents” were struggling with arrangements for the children’s care. She said the youngsters should spend equal time with each parent.And the judge said it was important that the children saw that their father was “still Jewish”.Judge Rowe added: “There have probably been occasional deviations from the Satmar rules for reasons including mistakes and occasional carelessness of the father or others, however I do not find that the father has deliberately or intentionally flouted the expectations on him or, in any event, that these have been either frequent or generalised.”The father knows what is at stake here. I find that he would not now deliberately cause problems for the children.”They must spend important religious days with him just as with the mother. Both parents must be part of the fabric of the children’s lives.”Judge Rowe said the children had to be given the “clear message” that their lives with each parent were “equally important”. They had also had been allowed to eat non-kosher food, she said. The woman also accused her estranged husband of taking off his kippah on Sundays.Detail of the case has emerged in a ruling by Judge Rowe following family court hearings in London. No one involved has been identified.Judge Rowe said family court litigation had started more than two years ago.She said she had made decisions relating to when the children, who lived with their mother, should spend time with their father.”The whole family lived a Satmar ultra-orthodox Jewish life until early 2013 when the father decided to leave the community,” said Judge Rowe in her ruling.”This was a seismic event for the family. The father continued thereafter to follow his Jewish faith, but at least for a time he did not practise within a settled Jewish religious community.She added: “The court had… to contend with the mother’s distress and fear of the children being exposed to an alien way of life on the one hand, and the father’s impatience at having to continue to follow the Satmar way of life during his time with the children on the other hand.” The whole family lived a Satmar ultra-orthodox Jewish life until early 2013 when the father decided to leave the community… this was a seismic event for the familyJudge Judith Rowe A Jewish father who left an ultra-orthodox community when splitting from his wife was accused of letting their two young children ride their bikes on the Sabbath and watch television, a family court judge has said.The man’s estranged wife told Judge Judith Rowe of her concerns about what the children were allowed to do when they visited their father.She said she was afraid of them being “exposed to an alien way of life” and of religious rules being broken.The mother said the children had “made many allegations”. One child had been allowed to press a traffic light button on the Sabbath. The other had been “shown an electronic device”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

  • Quick Take in the washing its coming

    first_imgWatch out: Met Eireann issues yellow alert over heavy rain>Motorists urged to take care on wet roads as Cork issues flood warning> IT’S A BANK holiday weekend, but unfortunately the weatherman doesn’t seem to care.Rain and wind is forecast for today, but eastern areas will be dry with a few sunny breaks for a little while yet.As you can see, the rain in the west is making its way across the country and will be in the east in all areas during the late morning and early afternoon.RainMet Eireann says the rain will be heavy for a time, but will clear to mainly dry and brighter weather later this afternoon and evening, but there will be more showers in the west. Southwest winds will be fresh and gusty and today’s highest temperatures will reach 13 to 15 degrees.Tonight, showers will affect most places overnight. The showers will be heavy and frequent in the west with the risk of hail and blustery southwest winds. Temperatures will range 7 to 9 degrees.last_img read more

  • Water Quality and Rail Transportation Issues to Be Industry Focus at Soybean

    first_imgOne of the great things about the Soybean Leadership College is its role in educating grower leaders about the latest industry issues impacting the soybean and the entire agriculture industry. At the 2015 ASA Soybean Leadership College in St. Louis on Jan.  6-8, water quality and rail transportation issues will be the key topics discussed in the Industry Issues Workshops.“These are two of the most pressing issues impacting soybean producers,” said Bob Worth, Chairman, ASA Membership and Corporate Relations Committee. “We will have some of our most active state organizations and top industry professionals educating participants about how water quality and rail issues are impacting their members and customers—and  how these organizations are addressing these challenges.”The water quality panel will feature Roger Wolf, Director of Environmental Programs and Services, Iowa Soybean Association, Adam Ward, Executive Director, Ohio Soybean Association. Wolf will speak about the Iowa Agriculture Water Alliance, a joint alliance with the Iowa Corn Growers Association and the Iowa Pork Producers. Ward will speak about the water quality issues, particularly discussing the Lake Erie situation and the Ohio Soybean organization’s research projects.The rail transportation panel will feature Mike Steenhoek, Executive Director for the Soy Transportation Coalition, Dan Mack, Vice President Rail Transportation and Terminal Operations at CHS, and Kevin Kaufman, TTMS Group. The panelists will address the national rail crisis and its impact on the soybean and agriculture industry.The Soybean Leadership College is open to ASA, USB, USSEC, state association and QSSB leaders and staff, soybean producers wanting to assume a leadership position on a state or national level, and college students seeking to further develop their organizational leadership skills. For more information about the 2015 Soybean Leadership College click https://soygrowers.com/learn/soybean-leadership-college/ .The 2015 Soybean Leadership College is sponsored by the following organizations:BASFUnited Soybean BoardArkansas Soybean Promotion BoardDelaware Soybean BoardIllinois Soybean BoardIndiana Soybean AllianceIowa Soybean AssociationKansas Soybean CommissionKentucky Soybean BoardMaryland Soybean BoardMichigan Soybean Promotion CommitteeMinnesota Soybean Research and Promotion CouncilNebraska Soybean BoardNew York Corn and Soybean AssociationNorth Carolina Soybean Producers AssociationNorth Dakota Soybean CouncilOhio Soybean CouncilSouth Dakota Soybean CouncilTennessee Soybean Promotion BoardVirginia Soybean Boardlast_img read more

  • 20 sea lions found dead in two months

    first_imgGEARHART, Ore. — About 20 dead sea lions — most with gunshot wounds — have been found in northern Oregon and southern Washington in just two months, a marine mammal researcher says.Dalin D’Alessandro tells The Oregonian that the shooting surge since the beginning of April is claiming both California and Steller sea lions. She’s a Portland State University research assistant with the Northern Oregon-Southern Washington Marine Mammal Stranding Network.The dead creatures have been found near the mouth of the Columbia River and a few miles to the north and south.D’Alessandro thinks the killing is due to fishermen frustrated over competition for their catch. While it’s typical to see a slight increase in dead sea lions around the opening of salmon season, recent numbers are about four times the norm for the same time period, she said.Last month, a federal judge rejected a request to halt the killing of California sea lions that eat protected salmon at Oregon’s Bonneville Dam. That program allows Idaho, Oregon and Washington authorities to kill targeted sea lions.California sea lions are federally protected as marine mammals, but not as endangered or threatened species. The area’s Steller sea lions are currently federally protected as a threatened species.last_img read more

  • Boaters rescued after watercraft takes on water near Virginia Key

    first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – Some boaters needed to be rescued after their watercraft started taking on water, near Virginia Key, Wednesday afternoon.Just before noon, Miami-Dade Fire Rescue received calls of a boat that needed assistance.A Miami Fire Rescue boat arrived to the scene and got those on board to safety.Rescuers the pumped out some of the water from the boat and towed it away.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

  • Abandoned Parkland home catches fire

    first_img Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. CSPFD on scene of a working structure fire in the 6200 block of NW 77th Terrace. Fortunately, this was a vacant home and no one was injured. pic.twitter.com/GQEdk3jqE9— Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department (@CoralSpringsFD) July 5, 2018No one was hurt.Investigators are now trying to figure out what caused the fire. PARKLAND, FLA. (WSVN) – Flames ignited overnight at an abandoned home in Parkland.The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department responded to the scene near Northwest 62nd Street and 77th Terrace, early Thursday morning.Firefighters tweeted out a video that showed them working to put out the fire.last_img read more

  • Chat Forums Mean Taking Your Lumps

    first_imgNothing is more frustrating than an anonymous poster running off at the mouth, especially when that poster is wrong. We take our lumps too, from getting rightfully nailed for mistakes we make to being called both apologists for and prejudiced against the same company in the same story. It’s rough out there in chat land. But buried there in all the noise is the pulse of what the industry is really thinking. And we all need to pay attention. Few topics spark industry response like lay-offs and hiring freezes, and there’s been a lot of that lately: see TV Guide, F+W, Cygnus, Penton. And that industry response, as you can expect, has been caustic, especially towards publishing company leaders. Some of it is fair, some of it is not, but it is what the industry is thinking. The FOLIO: edit policy for story comments reads: “We encourage lively, open discussion and posts, and only ask that you refrain from personal comments and remarks that are off topic. We reserve the right to edit/remove comments.” That means no personal attacks. Harshly criticizing a CEO’s strategy? Fair game. Calling that CEO an “idiot?” Out of bounds and we try to stay on top of it. This has to be civil, reasoned, business conversation. We won’t tolerate people hiding behind anonymity and throwing grenades. But publishing company CEOs also need to realize that the two-way conversation they tout as the future of their organizations applies to them as topics too. You can send out press releases about “difficult decisions” and “positioning the company for the future” but that message only goes one way. Online, the rank-and-file can respond. last_img read more

  • Cops plant saplings in Mancherial

    first_imgMancherial: As part of Haritha Haram drive, Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Rakshitha Krishnamurthy and Assistant Commissioner of Police (ACP) Ghouse Baba planted saplings on police station premises here in Mancherial on Thursday.Speaking on the occasion, the DCP said humans cannot survive without trees and hence everyone should plant trees to protect environment. She suggested everyone to plant saplings on every occasion in their lives like birthday, marriage day and to protect them till they grow. Circle Inspector Thirupathi Reddy, Sub-Inspectors Maruti, Omkar Yadav and Chandrasekhar and other staff participated in the plantation drive.last_img read more

  • Proposed Paycheck Bonus Tax Credit to Reduce Pay Disparity between Workers and

    first_imgChris Van Hollen is senior Democrat on the House Budget Committee.Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), is making good on several efforts to minimize the pay disparity between middle-class workers and wealthy investors with the introduction of a new Paycheck Bonus Credit legislation that would provide $1,000 per worker per year – or roughly $1.2 trillion over a decade.  The money, generated from financial transaction fees assessed against the top 1 percent earners in the nation, according to Van Hollen, would kick-start a solution to ongoing wage stagnation.Van Hollen, senior Democrat on the House Budget Committee and a former chairman of the party’s campaign arm for House races, voiced concerns in 2014 over the stagnant growth in wages for middle-class Americans, despite 58 months of private sector job creation and the creation of 11.2 million jobs.Calling it a “plan to help tackle the challenge of our times” and one that “works for all Americans, not just the wealthy few,” Van Hollen said trickle-down economic theory was not an option.“The Republicans’ [belief] that tax cuts for the wealthy will eventually trickle down to the middle class – has a long and proven record of failure.  We shouldn’t be talking about tax cuts for the wealthy; we should try to build this economy from the middle class out and from the bottom up,” Van Hollen said.Previously, Van Hollen suggested the development of a CEO-Employee Paycheck Fairness Act that would disallow corporations from deducting bonuses and compensations for their CEOs and other executives over $1 million unless the employees also earned some benefit.“Pay yourselves what you want, but if you want the taxpayers to allow you to deduct your bonuses and performance pay, for goodness sakes, you better be giving your employees a fair shake. And over time, that would close that gap [between] productivity and wages stagnation. Let’s help the workers, not just the CEOs. Let’s vote for the CEO-Employee Paycheck Fairness Act,” Van Hollen said.House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said the proposal was forward-thinking and necessary to meet the challenge of wage stagnation, which has gone unchallenged for the last 40 years.“In 2014, we created nearly three million new jobs, more than in any year since 1999.  For all our progress, however, too many Americans are still out of work and too many middle-class families still feel squeezed.  It is clear Congress must act to create jobs and expand the opportunities of working people and middle class families,” Pelosi said.Van Hollen remains hopeful of Republican-led Congress support and said the plan “attacks the chronic problem of stagnant middle-class income from both directions, creating bigger paychecks and letting workers keep more of what they earn.”Other provisions include investment in job training, through apprenticeship programs or partnerships with community colleges, an increase in the tax credit for child care from $3,000 per person to $8,000, or $16,000 per couple; and the creation of a “saver’s bonus” of $250 for workers who put at least $500 a year into retirement or other savings accounts.last_img read more

  • Closer look reveals how deep ocean squid uses leaky optical fibers to

    first_img Citation: Closer look reveals how deep ocean squid uses ‘leaky’ optical fibers to disappear into the background (2016, June 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-06-closer-reveals-deep-ocean-squid.html (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the University of Pennsylvania has discovered how a type of deep ocean squid is able to remain unseen by predators despite having clearly visible eyes. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Amanda Holt and Alison Sweeney describe their study of glass squid and how it has evolved to hide itself from predators that lurk in any direction. Glass squid live in the deep ocean and every part of their body except their eyes is clear, which helps to avoid being seen and eaten by predators from below. Such predators look up to find animals that create silhouettes against the distant light striking the surface of the water. Prior research had shown that the squid use what is known as counter-illumination to keep their eyes from being seen as part of a silhouette—they have organs below their eyes (photophores) that emit just enough light to match the light that is broadcast from above, preventing the eyes from being seen from below. But what about prey that live at approximately the same depths? That is what the research pair wanted to know, so they obtained some samples of the squid and put them under a microscope. They found that the photophores were actually made of cells that have a bend in them and that the walls were reflective—the two attributes together caused light to be channeled, like fiber optic cables. Looking even closer they discovered that the reflecting ability was not very efficient, which meant a lot of the light that was supposed to be channeled would leak out. At first, the researchers found this baffling, but then discovered that it actually served a very real purpose. In leaking small amounts of light, which turned out to be in many directions, the squid’s eyes became invisible to creatures that were at or near the same water level.The researchers confirmed what they had found by creating simulated leaking fiber cables that leaked in the amounts calculated from the squid, and by also reproducing the light levels in an experimental tank that simulated that in the environment where the squid lived—and found they matched. The end result, the researchers report was that the photophores were actually omnidirectional invisibility cloaks, noting that sometimes imperfections in a biological system might be producing better results than one that might seem perfect in other ways. © 2016 Phys.org Journal information: Journal of the Royal Society Interface More information: Amanda L. Holt et al. Open water camouflage via ‘leaky’ light guides in the midwater squid, Journal of The Royal Society Interface (2016). DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2016.0230AbstractGaliteuthis, a midwater squid, has photophores on the ventral surfaces of its eyes. These photophores emit bioluminescence to counter-illuminate the shadows cast by the eyes in downwelling sunlight, thereby hiding the eyes from upward-looking predators. The photophores consist of laminated fibre-like cells with semi-coaxial protein-dense layers around axial cytoplasm. These cells have been suggested to function as light guides: bioluminescence is an isotropic process used to hide in an anisotropic light environment, so any emission must be reshaped to be effective. We found a wide variation in cross-sectional geometries of photophore cells; some were more efficient at light guiding than others. We used a set of optical models to place these photophores in the context of the radiance where Galiteuthis lives and discovered a possible adaptive reason for this variation. In Galiteuthis’s horizontal and vertical range, ocean radiance is also quite variable. For complete camouflage, photophores must reproduce this variation in radiance using an isotropic source. Our models show that variation in the geometry of the photophore light guides reproduces the predicted variation in ocean radiance experienced by this species. By selectively activating geometrically distinct populations of photophore cells, the animal may reproduce the angular distribution of light at all positions in its habitat.center_img Explore further Scientists given rare glimpse of 350-kilo colossal squid Ventral view of a specimen of Galiteuthis glacialis recovered from the Ross Sea of Antarctica (71°59’S, 173°24’E). Specimen has a mantle length of 321 mm. Photograph by Darren Stevens of New Zealand, International Polar Year and the Census of Antarctic Marine Life. Credit: Wikipedia/ CC BY 3.0 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

  • Gastronomic delights

    first_imgShangri-La’s – Eros Hotel has on offer an enticing variety of authentic Malaysian dishes at its all-day dining restaurant Tamra. The festival that commenced on May 23 is organised in association with Tourism Malaysia and the Malaysian High Commission.  The Malaysian food festival features a wide variety of Malaysian specialties ranging from exquisite appetizers to traditional dishes. Chef Muhammad Lisarni brings the most authentic Malaysian gourmet flavours. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’One can savour the various Malay cuisine flavours crafted by Chef Muhammad Lisarni, such as Kerabu Udang Dengen Soohoon (prawns and glass noodle salad), Serunding Ayam (spicy dried chicken floss), Sup Sayur Cendawan (plain oyster mushroom soup), Ayam Masak Lemak Cili Padi (chicken in spicy coconut and turmeric gravy), Sayur Munir Goreng (stir fried mix vegetables with coconut gravy) and Terung Goreng Bersambal (deep fried eggplant with chili paste). Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixDrawing inspiration from the streets of Malaysia, Tamra sets a festive tone with red lantern, dream catchers and hangings. This food festival is a voyage designed to transport the diner to the beautiful country of Malaysia. Live carts stationed in the restaurant’s cavernous halls housing authentic delicacies, are all set to capture the essence of a Malaysian marketplace.last_img read more

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    first_img News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Technology | September 23, 2009 Certegra’s Connect.PACS™ Aids Decision Making Technology | Enterprise Imaging | July 05, 2019 Hyland Healthcare Adds ImageNext Imaging Workflow Optimizer to Enterprise Imaging Suite Hyland Healthcare is launching ImageNext, a vendor-neutral imaging workflow optimizer that combines intelligent imaging… read more Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019 Konica Minolta Healthcare Partners With DiA Imaging Analysis for AI-based Cardiac Ultrasound Analysis DiA Imaging Analysis has partnered with Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. to expand analysis capabilities of… read more Certegra’s Connect.PACS™ application makes available new and more complete information to better inform decision making. The application instantly integrates each patient’s CT contrast injection record with the associated clinical image sets stored in PACS. Connect.PACS automates recordkeeping, facilitates Joint Commission compliance and reduces manual records discrepancies. Radiologists gain efficiencies in conducting real-time or retrospective PACS image analysis. Administrators analyze standard or custom-designed key indicator reporting to gain insight for improving efficiency/productivity of radiology resources. Certegra products automate and continually advance how information is generated, mobilized and integrated in contrast-enhanced imaging. Despite wide variances in patients, procedures and staffing, Certegra products consistently:Personalize contrast-enhanced imagingIntegrate patient/study information with clinical systemsAutomate record keeping processesCreate workflow efficienciesProvide flexible access to more complete, accurate dataFor more information: www.medrad.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related Content Feature | Information Technology | June 27, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Smart Algorithm Extracts Data from Radiology Reports Radiology reports may contain information essential to figuring out a patient’s condition. read more News | Enterprise Imaging | July 29, 2019 Philips Announces 10-year Enterprise Informatics Agreement With Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Nancy Philips and Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) de Nancy, a leading academic hospital in the Grand Est… read more News | PACS | July 02, 2019 Laurel Bridge and 3M M*Modal Partner to Improve DICOM Structured Reporting July 2, 2019 — Laurel Bridge Software announced an expanded relationship with 3M M*Modal, a provider of clinical docu read more News | Enterprise Imaging | June 27, 2019 Ambra Health Announces Integration With Box Ambra Health announced an integration with Box to enable the sharing of medical imaging directly from within Box’s… read more News | PACS | June 26, 2019 Mini-PACS Solution for Image Management and Workflow Optimization ImageGrid Mini is a feature-rich, reliable and cost-effective image management and workflow optimization solution, pr read morelast_img read more

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    first_imgKey Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 2.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Related Content December 22, 2010 — Dell today announced its intent to acquire cloud-based medical archiving company InSite One Inc. to help healthcare organizations simplify retention of healthcare data. The InSite One solution helps customers reduce costs associated with long-term data storage and migration and eliminates one of the biggest shortcomings in healthcare today — the lack of sharing of images between medical professionals in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.The combination of InSite One’s cloud-based, vendor-neutral archive software and storage services with Dell’s Unified Clinical Archive solution will simplify data retention and let medical professionals access and share images regardless of the technology employed, Dell said.InSite One, headquartered in Wallingford, Conn., currently manages nearly 55 million clinical studies, more than 3.6 billion medical images and supports almost 800 clinical sites. Its secure, scalable cloud infrastructure supports all picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), data sources and modalities. Government and industry retention requirements, new modalities and the increasing resolution of medical images are creating unprecedented demand for storage among healthcare organizations. Medical image data in North America is projected to grow more than 35 percent annually to reach nearly 2.6 million terabytes by 2014. 1 Terms of the transaction, which is subject to customary closing conditions, were not disclosed.For more information: www.insiteone.com or www.dell.com1 ESG Research: North American Healthcare Provider Information Market Forecast 2010-2015, Sept. 2010. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more Feature | Information Technology | July 31, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr How Smart Devices Can Improve Efficiency Innovation is trending toward improved efficiency — but not at the expense of patient safety, according to… read more News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more News | December 22, 2010 Dell To Acquire InSite One News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019 Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021 August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative read more News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. News | Radiology Business | August 01, 2019 Philips Completes Acquisition of Carestream Health’s HCIS Business … read more News | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | August 01, 2019 DrChrono Teams With DeepScribe to Automate Medical Note Taking in EHR DrChrono Inc. and DeepScribe announced a partnership so medical practices using DrChrono EHR can use artificial… read more last_img read more

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    first_imgFacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Video Player is loading.Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Blog | Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant | November 17, 2011 Slice Wars, Dose Wars…No Wars Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Greg Freiherr, Industry Consultant Greg Freiherr has reported on developments in radiology since 1983. He runs the consulting service, The Freiherr Group. Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Computed tomography (CT) is caught in the throes of an uneasy peace.  The war days, when the big four – Toshiba, Siemens, GE and Philips – fought for market share with mega-slice machines, are gone. It looked for a while that a war waged with dose reduction technologies might propel the industry forward, but it just hasn’t happened.Slice wars propelled the industry – 4 slices, then 16, then 64 — with momentum sustained through a couple of half-steps in between. An abundance of 64-slice scanners, created by the last great surge in CT buying six years ago, satiated much of the appetite in the United States for new scanners. The result for vendors was an unnerving plunge that since 2006 has cut the $1.7 billion market for new CT units by more than half.When the bottom fell out of the market, dose reared an ugly head and CT algorithms, initially developed to improve image quality, were leveraged to bring down patient radiation exposure. The most advanced of these were and continue to be computing-intensive. They render the best results when built into new systems rolling off production lines. But the installed base has not embraced dose-saving technologies as it did slices. And for good reason.Many features designed to control patient X-ray dose had been onboard CT scanners for years. They simply weren’t being used very much. Just as we use only a fraction of the capabilities available to us in our word processing software, so had the radiology community overlooked many of the dose-cutting technologies that were right at their fingertips.Increased awareness of these capabilities, and the need to use them, have led many in the community to adopt their use.  Upgrades – and the purchase of some new systems – have led to further reductions in dose. But the response to dose has been far from that to slices.As we make plans again for our post-Thanksgiving pilgrimage to Chicago’s McCormick Place, we can expect to see dose reduction technologies bannered across the booths of RSNA exhibitors and talks by presenters. But those messages will be conveyed in an atmosphere of peace not war…much to the dismay of exhibitors. Related Content Video Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read morelast_img read more